crisis actors: theater as demonstration

June 2016 Peopling the Palaces, Queen Mary University of London

A new performance about trying to be serious when it’s better to be cool, about what happened in Greece last year, and about the future. Continuing their efforts to work out the role of the intellectual in revolutionary struggle, Goss and Ridout turn at last to doing proper interviews and dancing in bars. 

Review by Andrew Haydon, Postcards from the Gods:

"The form of quite/time is difficult to describe satisfactorily, which is to say, it’s actually incredibly original, and doesn’t slot neatly into a pre-understood category. It’s partly like a live version of a virtual performance (like those, for example that Ant Hampton and Tim Etchells curated for the ICA in 2009), while its set maybe looks like notes toward a Bert Naumann design for the Volksbühne on Rosa Luxumberg Platz, Berlin."

"And, then, in one of the most remarkable bits of writing for the stage I’ve ever seen, [Ridout and Goss] co-opt the song Rinse and Repeat as a kind of demonstration of and call for a revolution in the most elegant and reasonable fashion imaginable."

Also referenced in Haydon's "Europe: A Tragedy of Love and Ideology"

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2

sunshine

sunshine

questions

questions

eirini

eirini

bar falling quite the best

bar falling quite the best

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